Naomi Levy-Strumpf

Title(s): 
Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
Email: 
Office Location: 
Ramsay Wright 410
Biography: 

Dr. Levy-Strumpf received her Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. During her Ph.D. she investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying cell growth control and programmed cell death (apoptosis). She then joined the Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital where she focused on directed cell migration and axon guidance. Using C. elegans as a model system Dr. Levy- Strumpf takes a genetic approach to better understand how signalling networks interact to generate polarity in cell migration, axon guidance and cell invasion. In particular she focuses on two key signalling pathways, the Netrin signalling pathway, known to guide migrations along the dorsoventral axis, and Wnt signalling pathways that govern anterior posterior polarity. Naomi started teaching with the Human biology program in the summer of 2016. She is using her extensive research experience to teach classical and applied genetics courses, emphasizing current innovative techniques developed to analyze, edit and manipulate genes and genomes.

 

Select publications:

 

  1. Naomi Levy-Strumpf. Orchestrating A/P and D/V guidance – A Wnt/Netrin tale. Invited commentary. Worm Journal, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21624054.2016.1146857

 

  1. Levy-Strumpf, N., Krizus, H. Zheng, L. Brown and J. G. Culotti. The Wnt Frizzled Receptor MOM-5 Regulates the UNC-5 Netrin Receptor through Small GTPase-Dependent Signaling to Determine the Polarity of Migrating Cells. PLOS Genetics 11(8):e1005446, 2015. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005446. PMID: 26292279

 

  1. Levy-Strumpf, N and J. G. Culotti. Netrins and Wnts Function Redundantly to Regulate Antero-Posterior and Dorso-Ventral Guidance in elegans. PLOS Genetics 10(6): e1004381, 2014. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004381. PMID: 24901837

 

  1. Levy-Strumpf, N and J. G. Culotti. VAB-8, UNC-73 and MIG-2 regulate axon polarity and cell migration functions of UNC-40 in elegans. Nature Neuroscience 10(2):161-168, 2007. PMID: 17237777.